Tuesday, September 13, 2011

Grizzly law vs. common sense

Here is what turns Americans into tea partiers.



Sorry but that is simply nuts. Any grizzly that close to a home is a risk to any family especially one with six children. So this guy should have waited until the grizzly actually killed one of his kids? Maybe was starting to eat him? Sometimes I myself wonder if the federal government is nuts!

9 comments:

Celia said...

I agree, totally nuts.

FOLKWAYS NOTEBOOK said...

I believe that a different decision should have been made. I believe that we need to learn to live with all animals from black widows to black grizzley bears. -- barbara

Rain said...

I don't know if you read my other blog, Barbara, but we raise livestock here and this summer we had two lambs killed, at different times, by coyotes. When that coyote came back for thirds, my husband shot him. I've shot at coyotes quite a few times in similar situations and missed but not because I wanted to miss. Wild animals will kill and it's not just livestock. Montana has had several people killed by grizzlies this year. I'm all for live and let live but not when they are near my home or attacking something of mine, and this is one of those areas (and there are others) where I am not a liberal.

I don't know where you live but most people who favor letting predators be left to do whatever do not live with them as neighbors. Grizzlies are dangerous animals and unpredictable killers. It is not like they have a moral reason for not killing humans. It is one thing to kill one out in the open when it's not bothering you. Quite another that close to your home and getting closer. I have mixed feelings on protecting them given their numbers are growing and their range expanding. I sure don't want them or wolves as neighbors down here where I have livestock to protect but am told I cannot do it and have to just let them be killed to protect an endangered species who happens to be a very effective predator.

The other thing I don't like is imaging that young man spending a year in prison which is possible when he's a good citizen and did what many others would do in his situation.

I love watching the grizzlies when I am in Yellowstone and find them very impressive but I never for a minute forget they are a danger. Usually when we hike up there, we carry bear spray but you have to be 30' from them to use it and that would be closer than I'd want them to my house.

Rain said...

Incidentally I also never kill a spider even if I can relocate it outside or in the case of some let them stay in a corner of say the bathroom but a black widow would not be staying inside my house-- brown recluse neither...

FOLKWAYS NOTEBOOK said...

Rain -- I live in the dense woodlands of an Appalachian mountain area where bobcat, mountain lions, black bear, copperheads, black widows, recluses and coyotes live -- we all respect each other. -- barbara

Rain said...

And I respect your disagreement on this, Barbara but do disagree. A grizzly is not like a black bear for its temperament as you probably know. I respect the coyotes too and we have no joy in killing one but their job is to kill to live. Mine is to protect what is mine. That is what I think the Idaho man did. It didn't mean he got pleasure from it. Reality is that predators can turn on humans as well as other food species. I would not let a grizzly come toward my house that close. I can respect though the person what would be willing to die rather than kill. It is a choice. I don't believe we have a right to make that choice for someone else. Killing a grizzly that is minding its own business is one thing. Killing one that is coming too close to humans is another. I also don't see that putting this man in prison will help anybody.

dedogs said...

Ranchers flaunt, fatten, and harvest, livestock on vast grazing lands. And these other creatures, these wild meat eating creatures, should know that this isn’t for them to eat. Livestock is off limits to them! Dangerous wild creatures should know that eating livestock and killing is off limits; however, they never were properly educated. We humans have only killed, but have we really tried to reach out and educate that rodents and some deer are what they are allowed to eat, and livestock is off limits? Institutionalized education has helped many others learn about what their purpose is, and maybe with a proper education, wild creatures will learn what they can and can’t eat. Educating the dangerous creatures would be a great start toward stopping all killing. Educating the wildness out of the wild.

Your argument that wild creatures kill is not valid. A lot of things kill and we are successfully interacting with these particular entities. Allowing a child into an automobile, you can’t use the child sympathy as a justification for your killing. Oh, I forgot, it is human’s negligence that kills not automobiles. I am still waiting when humans are no longer negligent, which I believe will never happen.

Rain said...

Good sense of humor, dedogs. And I can't educate the deer or my sheep either to not eat my roses hence big fences. We do that to attempt to keep the coyotes out also which cost us a lot more money than a bullet would have, but we see the value of coyotes in the ecosystem, but we cannot let them eat our lambs. If you have ever heard a lamb cry for days because its twin was killed, you'd understand.

If you are a vegetarian, then you wouldn't like what we do in raising livestock for human food anyway. The thing is though when it's for human food, we can kill mercifully and we do it when they have reached the right age.

A coyote doesn't care about such. Although I will say coyotes are merciful killers. They have to be. They go for the throat and take down the lamb without more than the one slash. Wolves on the other hand, they aren't so kind in how they kill. They take the animal down and eat it while it's still alive-- same with grizzlies. It's easy to say it should not matter until it's you being eaten or worse your child.

The rancher in Idaho may have had the grizzly coming in to get the hogs they were raising. But if a child was out there, and in farm country, the kids don't stay in the house, it would be as easily on the menu. It's abstract for many people but not for those who live with grizzlies as neighbors. Sometimes they can trap the grizzlies and relocate them. People can help by not having garbage cans out to draw them in. There are things we can do but when they are right near the house, the interest I would have is purely in killing it and the fact that a government says I cannot, especially with grizzly numbers rising, well it won't make me prone to vote for those who would promote that.

For now the left wing has won on this issue and they are in the driver's seat. It will be a shame if by pushing an extreme view, which is that you don't have the right to protect your backyard, that you must wait until the animals is 30' off and heading straight for you or your child, the end result is the whole protection might be thrown out. Then it could be we lose all protection for them which would be a shame.

Incidentally predators are prone to kill cats and dogs too which if someone is against all domestication of animals will be just fine. PETA thinks that way from what I've read.

I've said many times that I am not all right or left wing and that shows up on various topics. This is one of them. No purist here.

Rain said...

This goes along with this story as in the end of the criminal charge against the man who shot the bear and another attack. I've been in the general area of this attack although not so far into the wilderness. When we hike in grizzly country, we carry up to date pepper spray which is supposedly effective... One hopes anyway. Montana Idaho Border Grizzly attack on hunter